Where do I go when I get a summons for a violation?

Where do I go when I get a summons for a violation?

The OATH Hearings Division is an administrative court that hears cases involving these types of violations. The Hearings Division is separate and distinct from the enforcement Agencies that issue the summonses. If you receive a summons, you must respond by the hearing date printed on the summons.

How to fight a summons in New York City?

All approved in-person appearances are held at: If you want a hearing by phone, email OATH at the hearing location on your summons: If your summons is eligible for an online hearing, you can fight it by filling out a form and uploading supporting documents online. Learn more and fight your summons online. You can reschedule your hearing once.

Do you have to respond to an oath summons?

OATH is separate and distinct from the enforcement Agencies that issue the summonses. You must respond to an OATH summons by the hearing date. All the information you need is provided on the ticket. If your summons says “mail-in penalty,” you can pay it without having to participate in a hearing.

What happens if you get a summons on Your House?

Open – or uncorrected – violations/summonses can prevent an owner from selling, refinancing, obtaining a new Certificate of Occupancy or Letter of Completion for their property. You must correct the violating condition (s) and certify correction with the Department.

What happens if a summons is not filed with DOB?

Upon re-inspection, if it is determined the condition remains or an acceptable Certificate of Correction has not been filed with DOB, additional summonses may be issued. To avoid the $1,500 civil penalty and further re-inspections of the condition, certify the summons as corrected with AEU.

What are summonses issued for in New York City?

New York City Agencies issue summonses for violations of quality of life laws and other City rules and regulations. These summonses, also called Environmental Control Board (ECB) Violations, include charges for: Health code violations; Dirty or blocked sidewalks; Improper garbage and recycling disposal; Loitering; Noise