How can school districts ensure that they do not discriminate against students with disabilities?

How can school districts ensure that they do not discriminate against students with disabilities?

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (commonly called Section 504), 29 U.S.C. � 701 et seq., prohibits public schools and private schools which receive federal funds from discriminating against children with disabilities. If a student is covered by IDEIA, he will also be protected by Section 504.

Can schools ask about disability?

No, you are not legally required to disclose your disability to your school; it is voluntary. However, if you do not disclose your disability, your school does not have to provide you with any disability services, including proper housing accommodations, special technological support, or extra time on tests.

Who determines if a student has a disability?

(The determination of whether a child suspected of having a specific learning disability is a child with a disability, must be made by the child’s parents and a team of qualified professionals which must include the child’s regular teacher; or a regular classroom teacher qualified to teach a child of his or her age if …

Why would a student get a 504 plan?

The 504 Plan is a plan developed to ensure that a child who has a disability identified under the law and is attending an elementary or secondary educational institution receives accommodations that will ensure their academic success and access to the learning environment.

Where can I find information on Disability Discrimination in schools?

For families with children in public schools or private schools that receive federal funding, the Office of Civil Rights for the Department of Education (OCR), www.ed.gov/ocr, provides resources to ensure that schools met the health-related needs of students and do not engage in disability discrimination.

Can a student with a disability go on a field trip?

Equal access to the school program includes equal access to filed trips. Unfortunately, sometimes schools overlook including students with disabilities in field trips or assume that because the student has a disability, the student is automatically excluded from participating. That is not the case.

Why are people with disabilities allowed to go to school?

The Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act (IDEIA), 20 U.S.C. § 1400 et seq., ensures that public schools provide a free appropriate public education to children whose disabilities impact learning.

Are there laws to protect students with disabilities?

Fortunately, there are laws that protect students with disabilities who have health-related needs and there are steps families can take to help prevent denials of health needs and discrimination from occurring.

Do you have to identify children with disabilities in school?

If you have a student who is struggling and has not been evaluated or received any help, read what IDEA 2004 says about Child Find. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act includes the Child Find mandate. Schools are required to locate, identify and evaluate all children with disabilities from birth through age 21. (20 U.S.C. 1412 (a) (3))

Why are children with disabilities not allowed to go to school?

Children who are at risk of seizures or a severe allergic reaction may be prevented from participating in activities such as field trips. Children with severe disabilities that impact breathing, elimination, or other bodily functions may need the school to provide an aide to assist them.

For families with children in public schools or private schools that receive federal funding, the Office of Civil Rights for the Department of Education (OCR), www.ed.gov/ocr, provides resources to ensure that schools met the health-related needs of students and do not engage in disability discrimination.

What happens if a child is found eligible for special education?

If the child is found eligible, the local district is responsible to provide services unless the family does not want them. In some cases, families arrange to have a child attend private or home-based school but receive special-education services through the public school.