Are there any nursing homes in the state of Alabama?

Are there any nursing homes in the state of Alabama?

Currently, in the state of Alabama, there is only one such nursing home listed as an SFF. View current SFF. View detailed explanations of this program and how it works.

Can a spouse in a nursing home keep their assets?

Is my spouse in a nursing home able to keep any assets? Yes, your spouse can keep a minimal amount of assets. This figure varies by state, but in most states, the spouse entering the nursing home can keep $2,000 in assets. What can be done to protect my assets? You cannot simply give your assets away to qualify a spouse for Medicaid.

Can a community spouse live in a nursing home?

No. If you, the community spouse, continue to live in your home, you will not lose it, regardless of the value. In addition to your house being exempt (a non-countable asset for Medicaid eligibility), other assets are also considered exempt. Therefore you are permitted to hold onto them.

Can a nursing home resident keep their home?

This means that, in most cases, a nursing home resident can keep their residence and still qualify for Medicaid to pay their nursing home expenses. The nursing home doesn’t (and cannot) take the home. Note that special rules apply if the Medicaid applicant owns a home in which he has equity of more than $536,000 (in 2013).

Currently, in the state of Alabama, there is only one such nursing home listed as an SFF. View current SFF. View detailed explanations of this program and how it works.

Can a nursing home file a lien against your home?

If the state believes that your stay in a nursing home will be a permanent arrangement, the state can file a lien against your home. This does not mean that you have to immediately sell it. It simply means that when your house is sold, the state will receive money from the sale for reimbursement of the cost of your Medicaid-funded care.

This means that, in most cases, a nursing home resident can keep their residence and still qualify for Medicaid to pay their nursing home expenses. The nursing home doesn’t (and cannot) take the home. Note that special rules apply if the Medicaid applicant owns a home in which he has equity of more than $536,000 (in 2013).

No. If you, the community spouse, continue to live in your home, you will not lose it, regardless of the value. In addition to your house being exempt (a non-countable asset for Medicaid eligibility), other assets are also considered exempt. Therefore you are permitted to hold onto them.